Form 10-Q
Table of Contents

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 


FORM 10-Q

 


 

x

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Quarterly Period Ended December 31, 2015

OR

 

¨

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Transition Period From                  to                 

Commission File Number: 0-14278

 


MICROSOFT CORPORATION

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 


 

Washington   91-1144442

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

One Microsoft Way, Redmond, Washington   98052-6399
(Address of principal executive offices)   (Zip Code)

(425) 882-8080

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

None

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer x

  

Accelerated filer ¨

Non-accelerated filer ¨ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  

Smaller reporting company ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ¨ No x

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.

 

Class    Outstanding at January 22, 2016  


Common Stock, $0.00000625 par value per share

     7,909,302,774 shares   

 



Table of Contents

MICROSOFT CORPORATION

FORM 10-Q

For the Quarter Ended December 31, 2015

INDEX

 

                 Page  

PART I.

  FINANCIAL INFORMATION        
    Item 1.   Financial Statements        
        a)    Income Statements for the Three and Six Months Ended December 31, 2015 and 2014     3   
        b)    Comprehensive Income Statements for the Three and Six Months Ended December 31, 2015 and 2014     4   
        c)    Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2015 and June 30, 2015     5   
        d)    Cash Flows Statements for the Three and Six Months Ended December 31, 2015 and 2014     6   
        e)    Stockholders’ Equity Statements for the Three and Six Months Ended December 31, 2015 and 2014     7   
        f)    Notes to Financial Statements     8   
        g)    Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm     30   
    Item 2.   Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations     31   
    Item 3.   Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk     47   
    Item 4.   Controls and Procedures     48   

PART II.  

  OTHER INFORMATION        
    Item 1.   Legal Proceedings     49   
    Item 1A.   Risk Factors     49   
    Item 2.   Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds     57   
    Item 6.   Exhibits     58   

SIGNATURE

    59   

 

2


Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

INCOME STATEMENTS

 

(In millions, except per share amounts) (Unaudited)    Three Months Ended
December 31,
    Six Months Ended
December 31,
 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Revenue

   $   23,796      $   26,470      $   44,175      $   49,671   

Cost of revenue

     9,872        10,136        17,079        18,409   


 


 


 


Gross margin

     13,924        16,334        27,096        31,262   

Research and development

     2,900        2,903        5,862        5,968   

Sales and marketing

     3,960        4,315        7,293        8,043   

General and administrative

     1,038        1,097        2,122        2,248   

Impairment, integration, and restructuring

     0        243        0        1,383   


 


 


 


Operating income

     6,026        7,776        11,819        13,620   

Other income (expense), net

     (171     74        (451     126   


 


 


 


Income before income taxes

     5,855        7,850        11,368        13,746   

Provision for income taxes

     857        1,987        1,750        3,343   


 


 


 


Net income

   $ 4,998      $ 5,863      $ 9,618      $ 10,403   
    


 


 


 


Earnings per share:

                                

Basic

   $ 0.63      $ 0.71      $ 1.21      $ 1.26   

Diluted

   $ 0.62      $ 0.71      $ 1.20      $ 1.25   

Weighted average shares outstanding:

                                

Basic

     7,964        8,228        7,980        8,238   

Diluted

     8,028        8,297        8,047        8,321   

Cash dividends declared per common share

   $ 0.36      $ 0.31      $ 0.72      $ 0.62   


See accompanying notes.

 

3


Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME STATEMENTS

 

(In millions) (Unaudited)    Three Months Ended
December 31,
    Six Months Ended
December 31,
 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Net income

   $   4,998      $   5,863      $   9,618      $   10,403   
    


 


 


 


Other comprehensive income (loss):

                                

Net unrealized gains (losses) on derivatives (net of tax effects of $5, $6, $28, and $10)

     (49     247        8        566   

Net unrealized gains (losses) on investments (net of tax effects of $86, $(124), $(222), and $(226))

     160        (231     (411     (420

Translation adjustments and other (net of tax effects of $(9), $(211), $(21), and $(258))

     (76     (390     (346     (471


 


 


 


Other comprehensive income (loss)

     35        (374     (749     (325


 


 


 


Comprehensive income

   $ 5,033      $ 5,489      $ 8,869      $ 10,078   
    


 


 


 


See accompanying notes.

 

4


Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

BALANCE SHEETS

 

(In millions) (Unaudited)             


    

December 31,

2015

    June 30,
2015
 

Assets

                

Current assets:

                

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 7,185      $ 5,595   

Short-term investments (including securities loaned of $360 and $75)

     95,455        90,931   


 


Total cash, cash equivalents, and short-term investments

     102,640        96,526   

Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $384 and $335

     14,507        17,908   

Inventories

     2,702        2,902   

Deferred income taxes

     1,618        1,915   

Other

     6,345        5,461   


 


Total current assets

     127,812        124,712   

Property and equipment, net of accumulated depreciation of $18,008 and $17,606

     15,789        14,731   

Equity and other investments

     11,514        12,053   

Goodwill

     17,436        16,939   

Intangible assets, net

     4,619        4,835   

Other long-term assets

     2,928        2,953   


 


Total assets

   $   180,098      $   176,223   
    


 


Liabilities and stockholders’ equity

                

Current liabilities:

                

Accounts payable

   $ 6,936      $ 6,591   

Short-term debt

     3,000        4,985   

Current portion of long-term debt

     750        2,499   

Accrued compensation

     3,649        5,096   

Income taxes

     493        606   

Short-term unearned revenue

     20,929        23,223   

Securities lending payable

     439        92   

Other

     6,447        6,766   


 


Total current liabilities

     42,643        49,858   

Long-term debt

     40,679        27,808   

Long-term unearned revenue

     4,102        2,095   

Deferred income taxes

     2,194        2,835   

Other long-term liabilities

     13,700        13,544   


 


Total liabilities

     103,318        96,140   


 


Commitments and contingencies

                

Stockholders’ equity:

                

Common stock and paid-in capital—shares authorized 24,000; outstanding 7,925 and 8,027

     68,279        68,465   

Retained earnings

     6,728        9,096   

Accumulated other comprehensive income

     1,773        2,522   


 


Total stockholders’ equity

     76,780        80,083   


 


Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

   $ 180,098      $ 176,223   
    


 


See accompanying notes.

 

5


Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

CASH FLOWS STATEMENTS

 

(In millions) (Unaudited)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Operations

                                

Net income

   $ 4,998      $ 5,863      $ 9,618      $ 10,403   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash from operations:

                                

Depreciation, amortization, and other

     1,544        1,521        3,005        2,949   

Stock-based compensation expense

     658        633        1,332        1,279   

Net recognized losses (gains) on investments and derivatives

     50        (179     151        (124

Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation

     (20     (22     (302     (524

Deferred income taxes

     (247     314        (174     615   

Deferral of unearned revenue

     12,570        10,200        22,993        18,222   

Recognition of unearned revenue

       (11,929       (11,495       (23,284       (22,138

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

                                

Accounts receivable

     (3,118     (3,378     3,258        3,249   

Inventories

     1,104        1,070        167        587   

Other current assets

     (912     (159     (1,192     (439

Other long-term assets

     56        170        51        449   

Accounts payable

     369        137        234        (522

Other current liabilities

     105        (986     (1,919     (2,152

Other long-term liabilities

     370        651        254        840   


 


 


 


Net cash from operations

     5,598        4,340        14,192        12,694   


 


 


 


Financing

                                

Proceeds from issuance (repayments) of short-term debt, maturities of 90 days or less, net

     (7,031     4,798        (2,141     7,797   

Proceeds from issuance of debt

     13,128        0        13,249        0   

Repayments of debt

     (121     0        (1,871     (1,500

Common stock issued

     117        121        336        337   

Common stock repurchased

     (3,678     (2,145     (8,435     (5,033

Common stock cash dividends paid

     (2,868     (2,547     (5,343     (4,854

Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation

     20        22        302        524   

Other

     (65     285        (243     285   


 


 


 


Net cash from (used in) financing

     (498     534        (4,146     (2,444


 


 


 


Investing

                                

Additions to property and equipment

     (2,024     (1,490     (3,380     (2,772

Acquisition of companies, net of cash acquired, and purchases of intangible and other assets

     (381     (2,794     (771     (2,935

Purchases of investments

     (34,750     (19,167     (72,320     (43,252

Maturities of investments

     5,351        2,389        11,037        4,082   

Sales of investments

     28,191        16,108        56,693        32,553   

Securities lending payable

     285        238        347        (129


 


 


 


Net cash used in investing

     (3,328     (4,716     (8,394     (12,453


 


 


 


Effect of foreign exchange rates on cash and cash equivalents

     (18     (34     (62     (40


 


 


 


Net change in cash and cash equivalents

     1,754        124        1,590        (2,243

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period

     5,431        6,302        5,595        8,669   


 


 


 


Cash and cash equivalents, end of period

   $ 7,185      $ 6,426      $ 7,185      $ 6,426   
    


 


 


 


See accompanying notes.

 

6


Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY STATEMENTS

 

(In millions) (Unaudited)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Common stock and paid-in capital

                                

Balance, beginning of period

   $   68,093      $   68,362      $   68,465      $   68,366   

Common stock issued

     117        121        336        337   

Common stock repurchased

     (609     (376     (2,157     (1,744

Stock-based compensation expense

     658        633        1,332        1,279   

Stock-based compensation income tax benefits

     20        23        302        525   

Other, net

     0        2        1        2   


 


 


 


Balance, end of period

     68,279        68,765        68,279        68,765   


 


 


 


Retained earnings

                                

Balance, beginning of period

     7,614        18,051        9,096        17,710   

Net income

     4,998        5,863        9,618        10,403   

Common stock cash dividends

     (2,846     (2,534     (5,708     (5,093

Common stock repurchased

     (3,038     (1,649     (6,278     (3,289


 


 


 


Balance, end of period

     6,728        19,731        6,728        19,731   


 


 


 


Accumulated other comprehensive income

                                

Balance, beginning of period

     1,738        3,757        2,522        3,708   

Other comprehensive income (loss)

     35        (374     (749     (325


 


 


 


Balance, end of period

     1,773        3,383        1,773        3,383   


 


 


 


Total stockholders’ equity

   $ 76,780      $ 91,879      $ 76,780      $ 91,879   
    


 


 


 


See accompanying notes.

 

7


Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

NOTES TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Unaudited)

NOTE 1 — ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Accounting Principles

We prepare our unaudited interim consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”). In the opinion of management, the unaudited interim consolidated financial statements reflect all adjustments of a normal recurring nature that are necessary for a fair presentation of the results for the interim periods presented. Interim results are not necessarily indicative of results for a full year. The information included in this Form 10-Q should be read in conjunction with information included in the Microsoft Corporation 2015 Form 10-K and Form 8-K filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on July 31, 2015 and October 27, 2015, respectively.

We have recast certain prior period amounts to conform to the current period presentation, with no impact on consolidated net income or cash flows.

Principles of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Microsoft Corporation and its subsidiaries. Intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated. Equity investments through which we are able to exercise significant influence over but do not control the investee and are not the primary beneficiary of the investee’s activities are accounted for using the equity method. Investments through which we are not able to exercise significant influence over the investee and which do not have readily determinable fair values are accounted for under the cost method.

Recasting of Certain Prior Period Information

In June 2015, we announced a change in organizational structure as part of our transformation in the mobile-first, cloud-first world. During the first quarter of fiscal year 2016, the Company’s chief operating decision maker, who is also our Chief Executive Officer, requested changes in the information that he regularly reviews for purposes of allocating resources and assessing performance. As a result, beginning in fiscal year 2016, we report our financial performance based on our new segments described in Note 18 –Segment Information. We have recast certain prior period amounts to conform to the way we internally manage and monitor segment performance during fiscal year 2016. This change primarily impacted Note 9 – Goodwill, Note 14 – Unearned Revenue, and Note 18 – Segment Information, with no impact on consolidated net income or cash flows.

Estimates and Assumptions

Preparing financial statements requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue, and expenses. Examples of estimates include: loss contingencies; product warranties; the fair value of, and/or potential impairment of goodwill and intangibles assets, for our reporting units; product life cycles; useful lives of our tangible and intangible assets; allowances for doubtful accounts; allowances for product returns; the market value of our inventory; and stock-based compensation forfeiture rates. Examples of assumptions include: the elements comprising a software arrangement, including the distinction between upgrades or enhancements and new products; when technological feasibility is achieved for our products; the potential outcome of future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our consolidated financial statements or tax returns; and determining when investment impairments are other-than-temporary. Actual results and outcomes may differ from management’s estimates and assumptions.

Revenue Recognition for Windows 10 Licenses

Customers purchasing a Windows 10 license will receive unspecified updates and upgrades over the life of their Windows 10 device at no additional cost. As these updates and upgrades will not be sold on a stand-alone basis, we are unable to establish vendor-specific objective evidence of fair value. Accordingly, revenue from licenses of Windows 10 is recognized ratably over the estimated life of the related device, which ranges between two to four years.

 

8


Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

Recent Accounting Guidance Not Yet Adopted

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued a new standard related to revenue recognition. Under the new standard, recognition of revenue occurs when a customer obtains control of promised goods or services in an amount that reflects the consideration which the entity expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services. In addition, the standard requires disclosure of the nature, amount, timing, and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from contracts with customers. The new standard will be effective for us beginning July 1, 2018, and adoption as of the original effective date of July 1, 2017 is permitted. We anticipate this standard will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements, and we are currently evaluating its impact.

In January 2016, the FASB issued a new standard to amend certain aspects of recognition, measurement, presentation, and disclosure of financial instruments. Most prominent among the amendments is the requirement for changes in the fair value of our equity investments, with certain exceptions, to be recognized through net income rather than other comprehensive income (“OCI”). The new standard will be effective for us beginning July 1, 2018. The application of the amendments will result in a cumulative-effect adjustment to our consolidated balance sheet as of the effective date. We are currently evaluating the impact of this standard on our consolidated financial statements.

NOTE 2 — EARNINGS PER SHARE

Basic earnings per share (“EPS”) is computed based on the weighted average number of shares of common stock outstanding during the period. Diluted EPS is computed based on the weighted average number of shares of common stock plus the effect of dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period using the treasury stock method. Dilutive potential common shares include outstanding stock options and stock awards.

The components of basic and diluted EPS are as follows:

 

(In millions, except earnings per share)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Net income available for common shareholders (A)

   $   4,998      $   5,863      $   9,618      $   10,403   
    


 


 


 


Weighted average outstanding shares of common stock (B)

     7,964        8,228        7,980        8,238   

Dilutive effect of stock-based awards

     64        69        67        83   


 


 


 


Common stock and common stock equivalents (C)

     8,028        8,297        8,047        8,321   
    


 


 


 


Earnings Per Share

                                

Basic (A/B)

   $ 0.63      $ 0.71      $ 1.21      $ 1.26   

Diluted (A/C)

   $ 0.62      $ 0.71      $ 1.20      $ 1.25   


Anti-dilutive stock-based awards excluded from the calculations of diluted EPS were immaterial during the periods presented.

 

9


Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

NOTE 3 — OTHER INCOME (EXPENSE), NET

The components of other income (expense), net were as follows:

 

(In millions)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Dividends and interest income

   $ 200      $ 183      $ 399      $ 408   

Interest expense

       (309       (162       (558       (323

Net recognized gains on investments

     106        317        108        396   

Net losses on derivatives

     (156     (138     (259     (272

Net gains (losses) on foreign currency remeasurements

     2        83        (34     161   

Other

     (14     (209     (107     (244


 


 


 


Total

   $ (171   $ 74      $ (451   $ 126   
    


 


 


 


Following are details of net recognized gains (losses) on investments during the periods reported:

 

(In millions)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Other-than-temporary impairments of investments

   $   (127   $ (26   $ (162   $ (35

Realized gains from sales of available-for-sale securities

     351          421        458        539   

Realized losses from sales of available-for-sale securities

     (118     (78       (188       (108


 


 


 


Total

   $ 106      $ 317      $ 108      $ 396   
    


 


 


 


NOTE 4 — INVESTMENTS

Investment Components

The components of investments, including associated derivatives, but excluding held-to-maturity investments, were as follows:

 

(In millions)    Cost Basis    

Unrealized

Gains

   

Unrealized

Losses

   

Recorded

Basis

   

Cash

and Cash

Equivalents

   

Short-term

Investments

   

Equity

and Other

Investments

 


December 31, 2015

                                                        

Cash

   $ 3,480      $ 0      $ 0      $ 3,480      $ 3,480      $ 0      $ 0   

Mutual funds

     1,428        0        0        1,428        1,428        0        0   

Commercial paper

     790        0        0        790        790        0        0   

Certificates of deposit

     1,062        0        0        1,062        921        141        0   

U.S. government and agency securities

     79,113        11        (232     78,892        350        78,542        0   

Foreign government bonds

     4,973        3        (39     4,937        216        4,721        0   

Mortgage- and asset-backed securities

     4,849        17        (9     4,857        0        4,857        0   

Corporate notes and bonds

     6,914        65        (106     6,873        0        6,873        0   

Municipal securities

     285        36        0        321        0        321        0   

Common and preferred stock

     6,395        4,862        (333     10,924        0        0        10,924   

Other investments

     565        0        0        565        0        0        565   


 


 


 


 


 


 


Total

   $   109,854      $   4,994      $   (719   $   114,129      $   7,185      $   95,455      $   11,489   
    


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

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Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

(In millions)    Cost Basis    

Unrealized

Gains

   

Unrealized

Losses

   

Recorded

Basis

   

Cash

and Cash

Equivalents

   

Short-term

Investments

   

Equity

and Other

Investments

 


June 30, 2015

                                                        

Cash

   $ 3,679      $ 0      $ 0      $ 3,679      $ 3,679      $ 0      $ 0   

Mutual funds

     1,100        0        0        1,100        1,100        0        0   

Commercial paper

     1        0        0        1        1        0        0   

Certificates of deposit

     906        0        0        906        776        130        0   

U.S. government and agency securities

     72,843        76        (30     72,889        39        72,850        0   

Foreign government bonds

     5,477        3        (24     5,456        0        5,456        0   

Mortgage- and asset-backed securities

     4,899        23        (6     4,916        0        4,916        0   

Corporate notes and bonds

     7,192        97        (37     7,252        0        7,252        0   

Municipal securities

     285        35        (1     319        0        319        0   

Common and preferred stock

     6,668        4,986        (215     11,439        0        0        11,439   

Other investments

     597        0        0        597        0        8        589   


 


 


 


 


 


 


Total

   $   103,647      $   5,220      $   (313   $   108,554      $   5,595      $   90,931      $   12,028   
    


 


 


 


 


 


 


As of December 31, 2015 and June 30, 2015, the recorded bases of common and preferred stock that are restricted for more than one year or are not publicly traded were $727 million and $561 million, respectively. These investments are carried at cost and are reviewed quarterly for indicators of other-than-temporary impairment. It is not practicable for us to reliably estimate the fair value of these investments.

We lend certain fixed-income and equity securities to increase investment returns. These transactions are accounted for as secured borrowings and the loaned securities continue to be carried as investments on our consolidated balance sheet. Cash and/or security interests are received as collateral for the loaned securities with the amount determined based upon the underlying security lent and the creditworthiness of the borrower. As of December 31, 2015, the collateral received under these agreements totaled $439 million which is primarily comprised of U.S. government and agency securities.

Unrealized Losses on Investments

Investments with continuous unrealized losses for less than 12 months and 12 months or greater and their related fair values were as follows:

 

     Less than 12 Months     12 Months or Greater          

Total

Unrealized

Losses

 
    


 


         
(In millions)    Fair Value     Unrealized
Losses
    Fair Value     Unrealized
Losses
    Total
Fair Value
   


December 31, 2015

                                                

U.S. government and agency securities

   $ 72,914      $ (202   $ 566      $ (30   $ 73,480      $ (232

Foreign government bonds

     3,635        (9     52        (30     3,687        (39

Mortgage- and asset-backed securities

     3,428        (9     329        0        3,757        (9

Corporate notes and bonds

     4,168        (68     377        (38     4,545        (106

Common and preferred stock

     1,329        (225     440        (108     1,769        (333


 


 


 


 


 


Total

   $   85,474      $   (513   $   1,764      $   (206   $   87,238      $   (719
    


 


 


 


 


 


 

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Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

     Less than 12 Months     12 Months or Greater          

Total

Unrealized

Losses

 
    


 


         
(In millions)    Fair Value     Unrealized
Losses
    Fair Value     Unrealized
Losses
    Total
Fair Value
   


June 30, 2015

                                                

U.S. government and agency securities

   $ 6,636      $ (9   $ 421      $ (21   $ 7,057      $ (30

Foreign government bonds

     4,611        (12     18        (12     4,629        (24

Mortgage- and asset-backed securities

     3,171        (5     28        (1     3,199        (6

Corporate notes and bonds

     2,946        (29     104        (8     3,050        (37

Municipal securities

     36        (1     0        0        36        (1

Common and preferred stock

     1,389        (180     148        (35     1,537        (215


 


 


 


 


 


Total

   $   18,789      $   (236   $   719      $   (77   $   19,508      $   (313
    


 


 


 


 


 


Unrealized losses from fixed-income securities are primarily attributable to changes in interest rates. Unrealized losses from domestic and international equities are due to market price movements. Management does not believe any remaining unrealized losses represent other-than-temporary impairments based on our evaluation of available evidence.

Debt Investment Maturities

 

(In millions)    Cost Basis    

Estimated

Fair Value

 


December 31, 2015

                

Due in one year or less

   $ 36,522      $ 36,479   

Due after one year through five years

     57,639        57,461   

Due after five years through 10 years

     2,519        2,441   

Due after 10 years

     1,306        1,351   


 


Total

   $   97,986      $   97,732   
    


 


NOTE 5 — DERIVATIVES

We use derivative instruments to manage risks related to foreign currencies, equity prices, interest rates, and credit; to enhance investment returns; and to facilitate portfolio diversification. Our objectives for holding derivatives include reducing, eliminating, and efficiently managing the economic impact of these exposures as effectively as possible.

Our derivative programs include strategies that both qualify and do not qualify for hedge accounting treatment. All notional amounts presented below are measured in U.S. dollar equivalents.

Foreign Currency

Certain forecasted transactions, assets, and liabilities are exposed to foreign currency risk. We monitor our foreign currency exposures daily to maximize the economic effectiveness of our foreign currency hedge positions. Option and forward contracts are used to hedge a portion of forecasted international revenue for up to three years in the future and are designated as cash-flow hedging instruments. Principal currencies hedged include the euro, Japanese yen, British pound, Canadian dollar, and Australian dollar. As of December 31, 2015 and June 30, 2015, the total notional amounts of these foreign exchange contracts sold were $9.5 billion and $9.8 billion, respectively.

Foreign currency risks related to certain non-U.S. dollar denominated securities are hedged using foreign exchange forward contracts that are designated as fair-value hedging instruments. As of December 31, 2015 and June 30, 2015, the total notional amounts of these foreign exchange contracts sold were $4.7 billion and $5.3 billion, respectively.

 

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Certain options and forwards not designated as hedging instruments are also used to manage the variability in foreign exchange rates on certain balance sheet amounts and to manage other foreign currency exposures. As of December 31, 2015, the total notional amounts of these foreign exchange contracts purchased and sold were $8.2 billion and $6.2 billion, respectively. As of June 30, 2015, the total notional amounts of these foreign exchange contracts purchased and sold were $9.7 billion and $11.0 billion, respectively.

Equity

Securities held in our equity and other investments portfolio are subject to market price risk. Market price risk is managed relative to broad-based global and domestic equity indices using certain convertible preferred investments, options, futures, and swap contracts not designated as hedging instruments. From time to time, to hedge our price risk, we may use and designate equity derivatives as hedging instruments, including puts, calls, swaps, and forwards. As of December 31, 2015, the total notional amounts of equity contracts purchased and sold for managing market price risk were $1.6 billion and $2.3 billion, respectively, of which $733 million and $1.0 billion, respectively, were designated as hedging instruments. As of June 30, 2015, the total notional amounts of equity contracts purchased and sold for managing market price risk were $2.2 billion and $2.6 billion, respectively, of which $1.1 billion and $1.4 billion, respectively, were designated as hedging instruments.

Interest Rate

Securities held in our fixed-income portfolio are subject to different interest rate risks based on their maturities. We manage the average maturity of our fixed-income portfolio to achieve economic returns that correlate to certain broad-based fixed-income indices using exchange-traded option and futures contracts, and over-the-counter swap and option contracts, none of which are designated as hedging instruments. As of December 31, 2015, the total notional amounts of fixed-interest rate contracts purchased and sold were $460 million and $2.8 billion, respectively. As of June 30, 2015, the total notional amounts of fixed-interest rate contracts purchased and sold were $1.0 billion and $3.2 billion, respectively.

In addition, we use “To Be Announced” forward purchase commitments of mortgage-backed assets to gain exposure to agency mortgage-backed securities. These meet the definition of a derivative instrument in cases where physical delivery of the assets is not taken at the earliest available delivery date. As of December 31, 2015 and June 30, 2015, the total notional derivative amounts of mortgage contracts purchased were $602 million and $812 million, respectively.

Credit

Our fixed-income portfolio is diversified and consists primarily of investment-grade securities. We use credit default swap contracts, not designated as hedging instruments, to manage credit exposures relative to broad-based indices and to facilitate portfolio diversification. We use credit default swaps as they are a low-cost method of managing exposure to individual credit risks or groups of credit risks. As of December 31, 2015, the total notional amounts of credit contracts purchased and sold were $525 million and $428 million, respectively. As of June 30, 2015, the total notional amounts of credit contracts purchased and sold were $618 million and $430 million, respectively.

Commodity

We use broad-based commodity exposures to enhance portfolio returns and to facilitate portfolio diversification. We use swaps, futures, and option contracts, not designated as hedging instruments, to generate and manage exposures to broad-based commodity indices. We use derivatives on commodities as they can be low-cost alternatives to the purchase and storage of a variety of commodities, including, but not limited to, precious metals, energy, and grain. As of December 31, 2015, the total notional amounts of commodity contracts purchased and sold were $642 million and $194 million, respectively. As of June 30, 2015, the total notional amounts of commodity contracts purchased and sold were $882 million and $316 million, respectively.

Credit-Risk-Related Contingent Features

Certain of our counterparty agreements for derivative instruments contain provisions that require our issued and outstanding long-term unsecured debt to maintain an investment grade credit rating and require us to maintain minimum liquidity of $1.0 billion. To the extent we fail to meet these requirements, we will be required to post collateral, similar to the standard convention related to over-the-counter derivatives. As of December 31, 2015, our long-term unsecured debt rating was AAA, and cash investments were in excess of $1.0 billion. As a result, no collateral was required to be posted.

 

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PART I

Item 1

 

Fair Values of Derivative Instruments

Derivative instruments are recognized as either assets or liabilities and are measured at fair value. The accounting for changes in the fair value of a derivative depends on the intended use of the derivative and the resulting designation.

For derivative instruments designated as fair value hedges, the gains (losses) are recognized in earnings in the periods of change together with the offsetting losses (gains) on the hedged items attributed to the risk being hedged. For options designated as fair value hedges, changes in the time value are excluded from the assessment of hedge effectiveness and are recognized in earnings.

For derivative instruments designated as cash-flow hedges, the effective portion of the gains (losses) on the derivatives is initially reported as a component of OCI and is subsequently recognized in earnings when the hedged exposure is recognized in earnings. For options designated as cash-flow hedges, changes in the time value are excluded from the assessment of hedge effectiveness and are recognized in earnings. Gains (losses) on derivatives representing either hedge components excluded from the assessment of effectiveness or hedge ineffectiveness are recognized in earnings.

For derivative instruments that are not designated as hedges, gains (losses) from changes in fair values are primarily recognized in other income (expense), net. Other than those derivatives entered into for investment purposes, such as commodity contracts, the gains (losses) are generally economically offset by unrealized gains (losses) in the underlying available-for-sale securities, which are recorded as a component of OCI until the securities are sold or other-than-temporarily impaired, at which time the amounts are reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income (“AOCI”) into other income (expense), net.

 

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Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

The following table presents the fair values of derivative instruments designated as hedging instruments (“designated hedge derivatives”) and not designated as hedging instruments (“non-designated hedge derivatives”). The fair values exclude the impact of netting derivative assets and liabilities when a legally enforceable master netting agreement exists and fair value adjustments related to our own credit risk and counterparty credit risk:

 

           December 31, 2015            June 30, 2015  
            


          


           Assets     Liabilities            Assets     Liabilities  
            


 


          


 


(In millions)          Short-term
Investments
    Other
Current
Assets
    Equity and
Other
Investments
    Other
Current
Liabilities
           Short-term
Investments
    Other
Current
Assets
    Equity and
Other
Investments
    Other
Current
Liabilities
 


Non-designated Hedge Derivatives

                                                                                 

Foreign exchange contracts

            $ 19      $ 109      $ 0      $ (141             $ 17      $ 167      $ 0      $ (79

Equity contracts

             135        0        0        (21              148        0        0        (18

Interest rate contracts

             5        0        0        (15              7        0        0        (12

Credit contracts

             9        0        0        (7              16        0        0        (9

Commodity contracts

             1        0        0        (1              0        0        0        0   


 


 


 


          


 


 


 


Total

           $ 169      $ 109      $ 0      $ (185            $ 188      $ 167      $ 0      $ (118
            


 


 


 


          


 


 


 


Designated Hedge Derivatives

                                                                                 

Foreign exchange contracts

           $ 17      $ 632      $ 0      $ (57            $ 56      $ 552      $ 0      $ (31

Equity contracts

             0        0        10        (29              0        0        25        (69


 


 


 


          


 


 


 


Total

           $ 17      $ 632      $ 10      $ (86            $ 56      $ 552      $ 25      $ (100


 


 


 


          


 


 


 


Total gross amounts of derivatives

           $ 186      $ 741      $ 10      $ (271            $   244      $   719      $ 25      $ (218
            


 


 


 


          


 


 


 


Gross derivatives either offset or subject to an enforceable master netting agreement

           $ 74      $ 741      $ 10      $ (269            $ 126      $ 719      $ 25      $   (218

Gross amounts of derivatives offset in the balance sheet

             (108       (113       (10     231                 (66     (71       (25     161   


 


 


 


          


 


 


 


Net amounts presented in the balance sheet

             (34     628        0        (38              60        648        0        (57

Gross amounts of derivatives not offset in the balance sheet

             0        0        0        0                 0        0        0        0   

Cash collateral received

             0        0        0        (330              0        0        0        (456


 


 


 


          


 


 


 


Net amount

           $   (34   $ 628      $ 0      $   (368            $ 60      $ 648      $ 0      $ (513
            


 


 


 


          


 


 


 


See also Note 4 – Investments and Note 6 – Fair Value Measurements.

 

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Table of Contents

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Item 1

 

Fair-Value Hedge Gains (Losses)

We recognized in other income (expense), net the following gains (losses) on contracts designated as fair-value hedges and their related hedged items:

 

(In millions)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Foreign Exchange Contracts

                                

Derivatives

   $ 48      $ 381      $   (33   $ 622   

Hedged items

       (41       (382     50          (624


 


 


 


Total amount of ineffectiveness

   $ 7      $ (1   $ 17      $ (2
    


 


 


 


Equity Contracts

                                

Derivatives

   $ (59   $ 18      $ (92   $ (63

Hedged items

     59        (18     92        63   


 


 


 


Total amount of ineffectiveness

   $ 0      $ 0      $ 0      $ 0   
    


 


 


 


Amount of equity contracts excluded from effectiveness assessment

   $ (15   $ (9   $ 4      $ (13


Cash Flow Hedge Gains (Losses)

We recognized the following gains (losses) on foreign exchange contracts designated as cash-flow hedges:

 

(In millions)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Effective Portion

                                

Gains recognized in OCI (net of tax effects of $15, $8, $43, and $12)

   $   122      $   357      $ 283      $ 692   

Gains reclassified from AOCI into revenue

     181        112        290        128   

Amount Excluded from Effectiveness Assessment and Ineffective Portion

                                

Losses recognized in other income (expense), net

     (72     (74       (154       (142


We estimate that $509 million of net derivative gains included in AOCI at December 31, 2015 will be reclassified into earnings within the following 12 months. No significant amounts of gains (losses) were reclassified from AOCI into earnings as a result of forecasted transactions that failed to occur during the three and six months ended December 31, 2015.

 

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Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

Non-Designated Derivative Gains (Losses)

Gains (losses) from changes in fair values of derivatives that are not designated as hedges are primarily recognized in other income (expense), net. These amounts are shown in the table below, with the exception of gains (losses) on derivatives presented in income statement line items other than other income (expense), net, which were immaterial for the periods presented. Other than those derivatives entered into for investment purposes, such as commodity contracts, the gains (losses) below are generally economically offset by unrealized gains (losses) in the underlying available-for-sale securities and gains (losses) from foreign exchange rate changes on certain balance sheet amounts.

 

(In millions)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Foreign exchange contracts

   $ (134   $ 28      $ (75   $ (205

Equity contracts

     (30     (24     4        (14

Interest-rate contracts

     9        24        8        18   

Credit contracts

     2        1        (3     (4

Commodity contracts

     (52       (106)        (136     (217


 


 


 


Total

   $   (205   $ (77   $   (202   $   (422
    


 


 


 


NOTE 6 — FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

We account for certain assets and liabilities at fair value. The hierarchy below lists three levels of fair value based on the extent to which inputs used in measuring fair value are observable in the market. We categorize each of our fair value measurements in one of these three levels based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement in its entirety. These levels are:

 

   

Level 1—inputs are based upon unadjusted quoted prices for identical instruments traded in active markets. Our Level 1 non-derivative investments primarily include U.S. government securities, domestic and international equities, and actively traded mutual funds. Our Level 1 derivative assets and liabilities include those actively traded on exchanges.

 

   

Level 2—inputs are based upon quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets, quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in markets that are not active, and model-based valuation techniques (e.g. the Black-Scholes model) for which all significant inputs are observable in the market or can be corroborated by observable market data for substantially the full term of the assets or liabilities. Where applicable, these models project future cash flows and discount the future amounts to a present value using market-based observable inputs including interest rate curves, credit spreads, foreign exchange rates, and forward and spot prices for currencies and commodities. Our Level 2 non-derivative investments consist primarily of corporate notes and bonds, common and preferred stock, mortgage- and asset-backed securities, U.S. government and agency securities, and foreign government bonds. Our Level 2 derivative assets and liabilities primarily include certain over-the-counter option and swap contracts.

 

   

Level 3—inputs are generally unobservable and typically reflect management’s estimates of assumptions that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability. The fair values are therefore determined using model-based techniques, including option pricing models and discounted cash flow models. Our Level 3 non-derivative assets primarily comprise investments in common and preferred stock, and goodwill and intangible assets, when they are recorded at fair value due to an impairment charge. Unobservable inputs used in the models are significant to the fair values of the assets and liabilities.

We measure certain assets, including our cost and equity method investments, at fair value on a nonrecurring basis when they are deemed to be other-than-temporarily impaired. The fair values of these investments are determined based on valuation techniques using the best information available, and may include quoted market prices, market comparables, and discounted cash flow projections. An impairment charge is recorded when the cost of the investment exceeds its fair value and this condition is determined to be other-than-temporary.

 

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Table of Contents

PART I

Item 1

 

Our other current financial assets and our current financial liabilities have fair values that approximate their carrying values.

Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on a Recurring Basis

The following tables present the fair value of our financial instruments that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis:

 

(In millions)      Level 1        Level 2        Level 3       

 

Gross Fair

Value

  

  

    Netting (a)     
 
Net Fair
Value
  
  


December 31, 2015

                                                

Assets

                                                

Mutual funds

   $ 1,428      $ 0      $ 0      $ 1,428      $ 0      $ 1,428   

Commercial paper

     0        790        0        790        0        790   

Certificates of deposit

     0        1,062        0        1,062        0        1,062   

U.S. government and agency securities

     75,122        3,773        0        78,895        0        78,895   

Foreign government bonds

     68        4,907        0        4,975        0        4,975   

Mortgage- and asset-backed securities

     0        4,858        0        4,858        0        4,858   

Corporate notes and bonds

     0        6,728        1        6,729        0        6,729   

Municipal securities

     0        321        0        321        0        321   

Common and preferred stock

     7,981        2,216        18        10,215        0        10,215   

Derivatives

     6        931        0        937        (231     706   


 


 


 


 


 


Total

   $   84,605      $   25,586      $   19      $   110,210      $   (231   $   109,979   
    


 


 


 


 


 


Liabilities

                                                

Derivatives and other

   $ 4      $ 267      $ 0      $ 271      $ (231   $ 40   


 

(In millions)      Level 1        Level 2        Level 3       

 

Gross Fair

Value

  

  

    Netting (a)     
 
Net Fair
Value
  
  


June 30, 2015

                                                

Assets

                                                

Mutual funds

   $ 1,100      $ 0      $ 0      $ 1,100      $ 0      $ 1,100   

Commercial paper

     0        1        0        1        0        1   

Certificates of deposit

     0        906        0        906        0        906   

U.S. government and agency securities

     71,930        955        0        72,885        0        72,885   

Foreign government bonds

     131        5,299        0        5,430        0        5,430   

Mortgage- and asset-backed securities

     0        4,917        0        4,917        0        4,917   

Corporate notes and bonds

     0        7,108        1        7,109        0        7,109   

Municipal securities

     0        319        0        319        0        319   

Common and preferred stock

     8,585        2,277        14        10,876        0        10,876   

Derivatives

     4        979        5        988        (162     826   


 


 


 


 


 


Total

   $   81,750      $   22,761      $   20      $   104,531      $   (162   $   104,369   
    


 


 


 


 


 


Liabilities

                                                

Derivatives and other

   $ 5      $ 159      $ 54      $ 218      $ (161   $ 57   


 

(a)

These amounts represent the impact of netting derivative assets and derivative liabilities when a legally enforceable master netting agreement exists and fair value adjustments related to our own credit risk and counterparty credit risk.

The changes in our Level 3 financial instruments that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis were immaterial during the periods presented.

 

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The following table reconciles the total “Net Fair Value” of assets above to the balance sheet presentation of these same assets in Note 4 – Investments.

 

(In millions)             


December 31,

2015

   

June 30,

2015

 

Net fair value of assets measured at fair value on a recurring basis

   $ 109,979      $ 104,369   

Cash

     3,480        3,679   

Common and preferred stock measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis

     727        561   

Other investments measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis

     565        589   

Less derivative net assets classified as other current assets

     (628     (648

Other

     6        4   


 


Recorded basis of investment components

   $   114,129      $   108,554   
    


 


Financial Assets and Liabilities Measured at Fair Value on a Nonrecurring Basis

During the three and six months ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, we did not record any material other-than-temporary impairments on financial assets required to be measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis.

NOTE 7 — INVENTORIES

The components of inventories were as follows:

 

(In millions)             


December 31,

2015

   

June 30,

2015

 

Raw materials

   $ 1,791      $ 1,100   

Work in process

     120        202   

Finished goods

     791        1,600   


 


Total

   $   2,702      $   2,902   
    


 


NOTE 8 — BUSINESS COMBINATIONS

Mojang Synergies AB

On November 6, 2014, we acquired Mojang Synergies AB (“Mojang”), the Swedish video game developer of the Minecraft gaming franchise, for $2.5 billion in cash, net of cash acquired. The addition of Minecraft and its community enhances our gaming portfolio across Windows, Xbox, and other ecosystems besides our own. The significant classes of assets and liabilities to which we allocated the purchase price were goodwill of $1.8 billion and identifiable intangible assets of $928 million, primarily marketing-related (trade names). The goodwill recognized in connection with the acquisition is primarily attributable to anticipated synergies from future growth, and is not expected to be deductible for tax purposes. We assigned the goodwill to More Personal Computing under our current segment structure. Identifiable intangible assets were assigned a total weighted-average amortization period of 6.3 years. Mojang has been included in our consolidated results of operations since the acquisition date.

Other

During the six months ended December 31, 2015, we completed 12 acquisitions for total cash consideration of $782 million. These entities have been included in our consolidated results of operations since their respective acquisition dates.

Pro forma results of operations have not been presented because the effects of these business combinations, individually and in aggregate, were not material to our consolidated results of operations.

 

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NOTE 9 — GOODWILL

Changes in the carrying amount of goodwill were as follows:

 

(In millions)   

June 30,

2015

    Acquisitions     Other     December 31,
2015
 


Productivity and Business Processes

   $ 6,309      $   264      $ (69   $ 6,504   

Intelligent Cloud

     4,917        244        (3     5,158   

More Personal Computing

     5,713        90        (29     5,774   


 


 


 


Total goodwill

   $   16,939      $ 598      $   (101   $   17,436   
    


 


 


 


The measurement periods for the valuation of assets acquired and liabilities assumed end as soon as information on the facts and circumstances that existed as of the acquisition dates becomes available, but do not exceed 12 months. Adjustments in purchase price allocations may require a recasting of the amounts allocated to goodwill retroactive to the periods in which the acquisitions occurred.

Any change in the goodwill amounts resulting from foreign currency translations and purchase accounting adjustments are presented as “Other” in the above table. Also included in “Other” are business dispositions and transfers between business segments due to reorganizations, as applicable.

As discussed in Note 18 – Segment Information, during the first quarter of fiscal year 2016 the Company’s chief operating decision maker requested changes in the information that he regularly reviews for purposes of allocating resources and assessing performance. This resulted in a change in our operating segments and reporting units. We allocated goodwill to our new reporting units using a relative fair value approach. In addition, we completed an assessment of any potential goodwill impairment for all reporting units immediately prior to the reallocation and determined that no impairment existed.

NOTE 10 — INTANGIBLE ASSETS

The components of intangible assets, all of which are finite-lived, were as follows:

 

(In millions)   

Gross

Carrying

Amount

           Accumulated
Amortization
        

Net

Carrying
Amount

   

Gross

Carrying

Amount

           Accumulated
Amortization
   

Net

Carrying
Amount

 


    

December 31,

2015

   

June 30,

2015

 

Technology-based (a)

   $ 6,880              $ (3,805        $ 3,075      $ 6,187              $ (3,410   $ 2,777   

Marketing-related

     1,955                 (612          1,343        1,974                 (540     1,434   

Contract-based

     797                 (710          87        1,344                 (862     482   

Customer-related

     608                 (494          114        632                 (490     142   


          


      


 


          


 


Total

   $   10,240               $   (5,621        $   4,619      $   10,137               $   (5,302   $   4,835   
    


          


      


 


          


 


 

(a)

Technology-based intangible assets included $147 million and $116 million as of December 31, 2015 and June 30, 2015, respectively, of net carrying amount of software to be sold, leased, or otherwise marketed.

Intangible assets amortization expense was $249 million and $491 million for the three and six months ended December 31, 2015, respectively, and $329 million and $701 million for the three and six months ended December 31, 2014, respectively. Amortization of capitalized software was $18 million and $36 million for the three and six months ended December 31, 2015, respectively, and $15 million and $55 million for the three and six months ended December 31, 2014, respectively.

 

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The following table outlines the estimated future amortization expense related to intangible assets held at December 31, 2015:

 

(In millions)       


Year Ending June 30,

        

2016 (excluding the six months ended December 31, 2015)

   $ 487   

2017

     832   

2018

     727   

2019

     583   

2020

     519   

Thereafter

     1,471   


Total

   $   4,619   
    


NOTE 11 — DEBT

Short-term Debt

As of December 31, 2015, we had $3.0 billion of commercial paper issued and outstanding, with a weighted-average interest rate of 0.21% and maturities ranging from 77 days to 92 days. As of June 30, 2015, we had $5.0 billion of commercial paper issued and outstanding, with a weighted-average interest rate of 0.11% and maturities ranging from 8 days to 63 days. The estimated fair value of this commercial paper approximates its carrying value.

In November 2015, we renewed our $5.0 billion credit facility set to expire on November 4, 2015. We currently have two $5.0 billion credit facilities that expire on November 1, 2016 and November 14, 2018, respectively. These credit facilities serve as a back-up for our commercial paper program. As of December 31, 2015, we were in compliance with the only financial covenant in both credit agreements, which requires us to maintain a coverage ratio of at least three times earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization to interest expense, as defined in the credit agreements. No amounts were drawn against these credit facilities during any of the periods presented.

Long-term Debt

As of December 31, 2015, the total carrying value and estimated fair value of our long-term debt, including the current portion, were $41.4 billion and $42.1 billion, respectively. This is compared to a carrying value and estimated fair value of our long-term debt of $30.3 billion and $30.5 billion, respectively, as of June 30, 2015. These estimated fair values are based on Level 2 inputs.

 

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The components of our long-term debt, including the current portion, and the associated interest rates were as follows as of December 31, 2015 and June 30, 2015:

 

Due Date        

Face Value

December 31,
2015

   

Face Value

June 30,
2015

   

Stated
Interest

Rate

    

Effective
Interest

Rate

 


          (In millions)               

Notes

                                      

September 25, 2015

        $ *      $ 1,750        1.625%         1.795%   

February 8, 2016

          750        750        2.500%         2.642%   

November 15, 2017

          600        600        0.875%         1.084%   

May 1, 2018

          450        450        1.000%         1.106%   

November 3, 2018 (a)

          1,750        *        1.300%         1.396%   

December 6, 2018

          1,250        1,250        1.625%         1.824%   

June 1, 2019

          1,000        1,000        4.200%         4.379%   

February 12, 2020

          1,500        1,500        1.850%         1.935%   

October 1, 2020

          1,000        1,000        3.000%         3.137%   

November 3, 2020 (a)

          2,250        *        2.000%         2.093%   

February 8, 2021

          500        500        4.000%         4.082%   

December 6, 2021 (b)

          1,901        1,950        2.125%         2.233%   

February 12, 2022

          1,500        1,500        2.375%         2.466%   

November 3, 2022 (a)

          1,000        *        2.650%         2.717%   

November 15, 2022

          750        750        2.125%         2.239%   

May 1, 2023

          1,000        1,000        2.375%         2.465%   

December 15, 2023

          1,500        1,500        3.625%         3.726%   

February 12, 2025

          2,250        2,250        2.700%         2.772%   

November 3, 2025 (a)

          3,000        *        3.125%         3.176%   

December 6, 2028 (b)

          1,901        1,950        3.125%         3.218%   

May 2, 2033 (b)

          598        613        2.625%         2.690%   

February 12, 2035

          1,500        1,500        3.500%         3.604%   

November 3, 2035 (a)

          1,000        *        4.200%         4.260%   

June 1, 2039

          750        750        5.200%         5.240%   

October 1, 2040

          1,000        1,000        4.500%         4.567%   

February 8, 2041

          1,000        1,000        5.300%         5.361%   

November 15, 2042

          900        900        3.500%         3.571%   

May 1, 2043

          500        500        3.750%         3.829%   

December 15, 2043

          500        500        4.875%         4.918%   

February 12, 2045

          1,750        1,750        3.750%         3.800%   

November 3, 2045 (a)

          3,000        *        4.450%         4.492%   

February 12, 2055

          2,250        2,250        4.000%         4.063%   

November 3, 2055 (a)

          1,000        *        4.750%         4.782%   


                

Total

        $   41,600      $   30,463                    
         


 


                

 

(a)

In November 2015, we issued $13.0 billion of debt securities.

 

(b)

Euro-denominated debt securities.

 

*

Not applicable

The notes in the table above are senior unsecured obligations and rank equally with our other senior unsecured debt outstanding. Interest on these notes is paid semi-annually, except for the euro-denominated debt securities on which interest is paid annually. As of December 31, 2015 and June 30, 2015, the aggregate unamortized discount for our long-term debt, including the current portion, was $171 million and $156 million, respectively.

 

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NOTE 12 — INCOME TAXES

Our effective tax rate for the three months ended December 31, 2015 and 2014 was 15% and 25%, respectively, and 15% and 24% for the six months ended December 31, 2015 and 2014, respectively. Our effective tax rate was lower than the U.S. federal statutory rate primarily due to earnings taxed at lower rates in foreign jurisdictions resulting from producing and distributing our products and services through our foreign regional operations centers in Ireland, Singapore, and Puerto Rico.

This quarter’s effective tax rate was lower than the prior year’s second quarter effective tax rate, primarily due to changes in the mix of our income before income taxes between the U.S. and foreign countries driven by the deferral of Windows 10 revenue in the current period. The prior year’s second quarter effective tax rate also included an Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) audit adjustment and non-deductible operating losses. The current year-to-date effective tax rate was lower than the prior year-to-date effective tax rate, primarily due to changes in the mix of our income before income taxes between the U.S. and foreign countries driven by the deferral of Windows 10 revenue in the current period. The prior year-to-date effective tax rate also included an IRS audit adjustment, higher non-deductible operating losses, and restructuring charges.

Tax contingencies and other income tax liabilities were $12.3 billion and $12.1 billion as of December 31, 2015 and June 30, 2015, respectively, and are included in other long-term liabilities. This increase relates primarily to current period quarterly growth relating to intercompany transfer pricing adjustments, offset by a partial settlement of the IRS audit for tax years 2007 to 2009 in the first quarter of 2016. While we settled a portion of the IRS audit for tax years 2004 to 2006 during the third quarter of fiscal year 2011, and settled a portion of the IRS audit for tax years 2007 to 2009 during the first quarter of fiscal year 2016, we remain under audit for those years. In February 2012, the IRS withdrew its 2011 Revenue Agents Report for tax years 2004 to 2006 and reopened the audit phase of the examination. As of December 31, 2015, the primary unresolved issue relates to transfer pricing, which could have a significant impact on our consolidated financial statements if not resolved favorably. We believe our allowances for income tax contingencies are adequate. We have not received a proposed assessment for the unresolved issues and do not expect a final resolution of these issues in the next 12 months. Based on the information currently available, we do not anticipate a significant increase or decrease to our tax contingencies for these issues within the next 12 months. We also continue to be subject to examination by the IRS for tax years 2004 to 2015.

We are subject to income tax in many jurisdictions outside the U.S. Our operations in certain jurisdictions remain subject to examination for tax years 1996 to 2015, some of which are currently under audit by local tax authorities. The resolutions of these audits are not expected to be material to our consolidated financial statements.

NOTE 13 — RESTRUCTURING CHARGES

Phone Hardware Integration

In July 2014, we announced a restructuring plan to simplify our organization and align the purchase of Nokia Corporation’s (“Nokia”) Devices and Services business (“NDS”) with our company’s overall strategy (the “Phone Hardware Integration Plan”). Pursuant to the Phone Hardware Integration Plan, we eliminated approximately 19,000 positions in fiscal year 2015, including approximately 13,000 professional and factory positions related to the NDS business. The actions associated with the Phone Hardware Integration Plan were completed as of June 30, 2015.

In connection with the Phone Hardware Integration Plan, we incurred restructuring charges of $132 million and $1.2 billion during the three and six months ended December 31, 2014, respectively, including severance expenses and other reorganization costs, primarily associated with our facilities consolidation. Total restructuring charges incurred under the Phone Hardware Integration Plan were $1.3 billion, all of which were recognized in fiscal year 2015.

Phone Hardware Restructuring

In June 2015, management approved a plan to restructure our phone business to better focus and align resources (the “Phone Hardware Restructuring Plan”), under which we will eliminate up to 7,800 positions in fiscal year 2016. The actions associated with the Phone Hardware Restructuring Plan are expected to be completed as of June 30, 2016.

To date, we have incurred restructuring charges of $780 million under the Phone Hardware Restructuring Plan, including severance expenses and other reorganization costs.

 

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Restructuring charges associated with these plans were included in impairment, integration, and restructuring expenses in our consolidated income statement, and reflected in Corporate and Other in our table of operating income (loss) by segment in Note 18 – Segment Information.

Changes in the restructuring liability were as follows:

 

(In millions)

     Severance       

 

 

Asset

Impairments

and  Other

  

  

(a)

    Total   


Restructuring liability as of June 30, 2015

   $ 588      $ 249      $ 837   

Restructuring charges

     0        0        0   

Cash paid

       (288     (72       (360

Other

     (23     0        (23


 


 


Restructuring liability as of December 31, 2015

   $ 277      $   177      $ 454   
    


 


 


 

(a)

“Asset Impairments and Other” primarily reflects activities associated with the consolidation of our facilities and manufacturing operations, including asset write-downs as well as contract termination costs.

NOTE 14 — UNEARNED REVENUE

Unearned revenue by segment was as follows:

 

(In millions)             


December 31,

2015

    June 30,
2015
 

Productivity and Business Processes

   $ 10,110      $ 11,643   

Intelligent Cloud

     8,811        10,346   

More Personal Computing

     2,900        3,246   

Corporate and Other

     3,210        83   


 


Total

   $   25,031      $   25,318   
    


 


As of December 31, 2015, we deferred a net $3.0 billion in revenue related to Windows 10 and a net $191 million in revenue related to Halo 5. Revenue from Windows 10 and Halo 5 is primarily recognized upfront in the More Personal Computing segment, and the deferral and subsequent recognition of revenue is reflected in Corporate and Other.

NOTE 15 — CONTINGENCIES

Patent and Intellectual Property Claims

IPCom patent litigation

IPCom GmbH & Co. (“IPCom”) is a German company that holds a large portfolio of mobile technology-related patents spanning about 170 patent families and addressing a broad range of cellular technologies. IPCom has asserted 19 of these patents in litigation against Nokia and many of the leading cell phone companies and operators. In November 2014, Microsoft and IPCom entered into a standstill agreement staying all of the pending litigation against Microsoft to permit the parties to pursue settlement discussions.

InterDigital patent litigation

InterDigital Technology Corporation and InterDigital Communications Corporation (collectively, “IDT”) filed four patent infringement cases against Nokia in the International Trade Commission (“ITC”) and in U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware between 2007 and 2013. We have been added to these cases as a defendant. IDT has cases pending against other defendants based on the same patents because most of the patents at issue allegedly relate to 3G and 4G wireless communications standards essential functionality. The cases involving us include three ITC investigations where IDT sought an order excluding importation of 3G and 4G phones into the U.S. and one active case in U.S. District Court in Delaware seeking an injunction and damages. Each of the ITC matters has been resolved in our favor. In September 2015, the United States Patent Trial and Appeal Board issued a final written

 

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decision that deemed unpatentable all asserted claims of the patent remaining at issue in the Delaware case in an inter partes review. IDT has appealed this decision to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The Delaware case has been stayed pending final completion of the inter partes review (including appeals and any subsequent proceedings in the Patent Office). We filed an antitrust complaint against IDT in the District of Delaware in August 2015 asserting violations of Section 2 of the Sherman Act, alleging the unlawful exploitation of standard essential patents. IDT filed a motion to dismiss, which remains pending.

European copyright levies

We assumed from Nokia all potential liability due to Nokia’s alleged failure to pay “private copying levies” in various European countries based upon sale of memory cards and mobile phones that incorporate blank memory. The levies are based upon a 2001 European Union (“EU”) Directive establishing a right for end users to make copies of copyrighted works for personal or private use, but also allowing the collection of levies based upon sales of blank media or recording devices to compensate copyright holders for private copying. Various collecting societies in EU countries initiated litigation against Nokia, stating that Nokia must pay levies not only based upon sales of blank memory cards, but also phones that include blank memory for data storage on the phones, regardless of actual usage of that memory. The most significant cases against Nokia are pending in Germany and Austria, due to both the high volume of sales and high levy amounts sought in these countries. In December 2015, the industry group BITKOM, of which we are a member, reached a tentative settlement with the German collecting society for all claims from 2008 forward, leaving litigation only for the period 2004-2007 pending in Germany. In addition, the industry is engaged in settlement negotiations with the Austrian collecting society.

Other patent and intellectual property claims

In addition to these cases, there are approximately 65 other patent infringement cases pending against Microsoft.

Antitrust and Unfair Competition Claims

Three antitrust and unfair competition class action lawsuits were filed against us in British Columbia, Ontario, and Quebec, Canada on behalf of various classes of direct and indirect purchasers of our PC operating system and certain other software products between 1999 and 2005.

In 2010, the court in the British Columbia case certified it as a class action. After the British Columbia Court of Appeal dismissed the case, in 2013 the Canadian Supreme Court reversed the appellate court and reinstated part of the British Columbia case, which is now scheduled for trial beginning in 2016. The other two cases are inactive.

China State Administration for Industry and Commerce investigation

In 2014, Microsoft was informed that China’s State Administration for Industry and Commerce (“SAIC”) had begun a formal investigation relating to China’s Anti-Monopoly Law, and the SAIC conducted onsite inspections of Microsoft offices in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou, and Chengdu. SAIC has stated the investigation relates to compatibility, bundle sales, and file verification issues related to Windows and Office software.

Product-Related Litigation

U.S. cell phone litigation

Nokia, along with other handset manufacturers and network operators, is a defendant in 19 lawsuits filed in the Superior Court for the District of Columbia by individual plaintiffs who allege that radio emissions from cellular handsets caused their brain tumors and other adverse health effects. We have assumed responsibility for these claims as part of the NDS acquisition and have been substituted for the Nokia defendants. Nine of these cases were filed in 2002 and are consolidated for certain pre-trial proceedings; the remaining 10 cases are stayed. In a separate 2009 decision, the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia held that adverse health effect claims arising from the use of cellular handsets that operate within the U.S. Federal Communications Commission radio frequency emission guidelines (“FCC Guidelines”) are pre-empted by federal law. The plaintiffs allege that their handsets either operated outside the FCC Guidelines or were manufactured before the FCC Guidelines went into effect. The lawsuits also allege an industry-wide conspiracy to manipulate the science and testing around emission guidelines.

In 2013, defendants in the consolidated cases moved to exclude plaintiffs’ expert evidence of general causation on the basis of flawed scientific methodologies. In 2014, the court granted in part defendants’ motion to exclude

 

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plaintiffs’ general causation experts. The plaintiffs filed an interlocutory appeal. The District of Columbia Court of Appeals agreed to hear en banc defendants’ interlocutory appeal challenging the standard for evaluating expert scientific evidence. Trial court proceedings are stayed pending resolution of the appeal.

Canadian cell phone class action

Nokia, along with other handset manufacturers and network operators, is a defendant in a 2013 class action lawsuit filed in the Supreme Court of British Columbia by a purported class of Canadians who have used cellular phones for at least 1,600 hours, including a subclass of users with brain tumors. Microsoft was served with the complaint in June 2014 and has been substituted for the Nokia defendants. The litigation is not yet active as several defendants remain to be served.

Other

We also are subject to a variety of other claims and suits that arise from time to time in the ordinary course of our business. Although management currently believes that resolving claims against us, individually or in aggregate, will not have a material adverse impact on our consolidated financial statements, these matters are subject to inherent uncertainties and management’s view of these matters may change in the future.

As of December 31, 2015, we accrued aggregate legal liabilities of $550 million in other current liabilities and $10 million in other long-term liabilities. While we intend to defend these matters vigorously, adverse outcomes that we estimate could reach approximately $1.5 billion in aggregate beyond recorded amounts are reasonably possible. Were unfavorable final outcomes to occur, there exists the possibility of a material adverse impact on our consolidated financial statements for the period in which the effects become reasonably estimable.

NOTE 16 — STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

Share Repurchases

We repurchased the following shares of common stock through our share repurchase program during the periods presented:

 

(In millions)    Three Months Ended
December 31,
    Six Months Ended
December 31,
 


       2015        2014        2015        2014   

Shares of common stock repurchased

     66        43        155        86   

Value of common stock repurchased

   $   3,600      $   2,000      $   7,600      $   4,000   


The above table excludes shares repurchased to settle statutory employee tax withholding related to the vesting of stock awards. On September 16, 2013, our Board of Directors approved a share repurchase program authorizing up to $40.0 billion in share repurchases. The share repurchase program became effective on October 1, 2013, has no expiration date, and may be suspended or discontinued at any time without notice. As of December 31, 2015, $14.3 billion remained of our $40.0 billion share repurchase program. All repurchases were made using cash resources.

Dividends

Our Board of Directors declared the following dividends:

 

Declaration Date    Dividend
Per Share
    Record Date      Total Amount     Payment Date  


                  (in millions)        

Fiscal Year 2016

                                 

September 15, 2015

   $ 0.36        November 19, 2015       $ 2,868        December 10, 2015   

December 2, 2015

   $   0.36        February 18, 2016       $   2,853        March 10, 2016   


 

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Declaration Date    Dividend
Per Share
    Record Date      Total Amount     Payment Date  


                  (in millions)        

Fiscal Year 2015

                                 

September 16, 2014

   $   0.31        November 20, 2014       $   2,547        December 11, 2014   

December 3, 2014

   $ 0.31        February 19, 2015       $ 2,532        March 12, 2015   


The dividend declared on December 2, 2015 was included in other current liabilities as of December 31, 2015.

NOTE 17 — ACCUMULATED OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

The following table summarizes the changes in accumulated other comprehensive income by component:

 

(In millions)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Derivatives

                                

Accumulated other comprehensive income balance, beginning of period

   $ 647      $ 350      $ 590      $ 31   

Unrealized gains, net of tax effects of $15, $8, $43, and $12

     122        357        283        692   

Reclassification adjustments for gains included in revenue

     (181     (112     (290     (128

Tax expense included in provision for income taxes

     10        2        15        2   


 


 


 


Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income

     (171     (110     (275     (126


 


 


 


Net current period other comprehensive income (loss)

     (49     247        8        566   


 


 


 


Accumulated other comprehensive income balance, end of period

   $ 598      $ 597      $ 598      $ 597   


 


 


 


Investments

                                

Accumulated other comprehensive income balance, beginning of period

   $ 2,598      $ 3,342      $ 3,169      $ 3,531   

Unrealized gains (losses), net of tax effects of $122, $(12), $(183), and $(86)

     228        (24     (338     (162

Reclassification adjustments for gains included in other income (expense), net

     (104     (319     (112     (398

Tax expense included in provision for income taxes

     36        112        39        140   


 


 


 


Amounts reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income

     (68     (207     (73     (258


 


 


 


Net current period other comprehensive income (loss)

     160        (231     (411     (420


 


 


 


Accumulated other comprehensive income balance, end of period

   $ 2,758      $ 3,111      $ 2,758      $ 3,111   


 


 


 


Translation adjustments and other

                                

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) balance, beginning of period

   $ (1,507   $ 65      $ (1,237   $ 146   

Translation adjustments and other, net of tax effects of $(9), $(211), $(21), and $(258)

     (76     (390     (346     (471


 


 


 


Accumulated other comprehensive loss balance, end of period

   $   (1,583   $ (325   $   (1,583   $ (325


 


 


 


Accumulated other comprehensive income, end of period

   $ 1,773      $   3,383      $ 1,773      $   3,383   
    


 


 


 


 

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NOTE 18 — SEGMENT INFORMATION

In its operation of the business, management, including our chief operating decision maker, reviews certain financial information, including segmented internal profit and loss statements prepared on a basis not consistent with U.S. GAAP.

In June 2015, we announced a change in organizational structure as part of our transformation in the mobile-first, cloud-first world. During the first quarter of fiscal year 2016, the Company’s chief operating decision maker requested changes in the information that he regularly reviews for purposes of allocating resources and assessing performance. As a result, beginning in fiscal year 2016, we report our financial performance based on our new segments, Productivity and Business Processes, Intelligent Cloud, and More Personal Computing, and analyze operating income as the measure of segment profitability. We have recast certain prior period amounts to conform to the way we internally manage and monitor segment performance.

Our reportable segments are described below.

Productivity and Business Processes

Our Productivity and Business Processes segment consists of products and cloud services in our portfolio of productivity, communication, and information services, spanning a variety of devices and platforms. This segment primarily comprises:

 

   

Office Commercial, including volume licensing and subscriptions to Office 365 Commercial for products and cloud services such as Microsoft Office, Exchange, SharePoint, and Skype for Business, and related Client Access Licenses (“CALs”).

 

   

Office Consumer, including Office sold through retail or through an Office 365 Consumer subscription, and Office Consumer Services, including Outlook.com, OneDrive, and consumer Skype services.

 

   

Microsoft Dynamics business solutions, including Dynamics ERP products, Dynamics CRM on-premises, and Dynamics CRM Online (“Microsoft Dynamics”).

Intelligent Cloud

Our Intelligent Cloud segment consists of our public, private, and hybrid server products and cloud services that can power modern business. This segment primarily comprises:

 

   

Server products and cloud services, including Windows Server, Microsoft SQL Server, Visual Studio, System Center, and related CALs, as well as Microsoft Azure.

 

   

Enterprise Services, including Premier Support Services and Microsoft Consulting Services.

More Personal Computing

Our More Personal Computing segment consists of products and services geared towards harmonizing the interests of end users, developers, and information technology professionals across screens of all sizes. This segment primarily comprises:

 

   

Windows, including Windows original equipment manufacturer licensing (“Windows OEM”) and other non-volume licensing of the Windows operating system, volume licensing of the Windows operating system, patent licensing, Windows Embedded, MSN display advertising, and Windows Phone licensing.

 

   

Devices, including phones, Surface, and Microsoft PC accessories.

 

   

Gaming, including Xbox hardware; Xbox Live, comprising transactions, subscriptions, and advertising; video games; and third-party video game royalties.

 

   

Search advertising.

Revenue and costs are generally directly attributed to our segments. However, due to the integrated structure of our business, certain revenue recognized and costs incurred by one segment may benefit other segments. Revenue on certain contracts is allocated among the segments based on the relative value of the underlying products and services, which can include allocation based on actual prices charged, prices when sold separately, or estimated costs plus a profit margin. Cost of revenue is allocated in certain cases based on a relative revenue methodology. Operating expenses that are allocated primarily include those relating to marketing of products and services from which multiple segments benefit, and are generally allocated based on relative gross margin.

 

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In addition, certain costs incurred at a corporate level that are identifiable and that benefit our segments are allocated to them. These allocated costs include costs of: legal, including settlements and fines; information technology; human resources; finance; excise taxes; field selling; shared facilities services; and customer service and support. Each allocation is measured differently based on the specific facts and circumstances of the costs being allocated. Certain corporate-level activity is not allocated to our segments, including impairment, integration, and restructuring expenses.

Segment revenue and operating income (loss) were as follows during the periods presented:

 

(In millions)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Revenue

  

       

Productivity and Business Processes

   $ 6,690      $ 6,822      $ 12,990      $ 13,312   

Intelligent Cloud

     6,343        6,041        12,232        11,516   

More Personal Computing

     12,660        13,282        22,114        24,548   

Corporate and Other

     (1,897     325        (3,161     295   


 


 


 


Total revenue

   $   23,796      $   26,470      $   44,175      $   49,671   
    


 


 


 


 

(In millions)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Operating income (loss)

  

       

Productivity and Business Processes

   $ 3,305      $ 3,587      $ 6,460      $ 6,988   

Intelligent Cloud

     2,580        2,600        4,977        4,705   

More Personal Computing

     2,038        1,506        3,542        3,014   

Corporate and Other

     (1,897     83        (3,160     (1,087


 


 


 


Total operating income

   $   6,026      $   7,776      $   11,819      $   13,620   
    


 


 


 


Corporate and Other operating income (loss) includes adjustments to conform our internal accounting policies to U.S. GAAP, and impairment, integration, and restructuring expenses. Significant internal accounting policies that differ from U.S. GAAP relate to revenue recognition.

Corporate and Other operating income (loss) activity was as follows during the periods presented:

 

(In millions)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Six Months Ended

December 31,

 


     2015     2014     2015     2014  

Revenue reconciling amounts and other (a)

   $   (1,897   $ 326      $ (3,160   $ 296   

Impairment, integration, and restructuring expenses

     0          (243     0        (1,383


 


 


 


Total Corporate and Other

   $ (1,897   $ 83      $   (3,160   $   (1,087
    


 


 


 


 

(a)

Revenue reconciling amounts and other for the three months ended December 31, 2015 included a net $1.7 billion of revenue deferrals related to sales of Windows 10 and a net $191 million of revenue deferrals related to Halo 5. Revenue reconciling amounts and other for the three months ended December 31, 2014 included the net recognition of $326 million of previously deferred revenue related to sales of bundled products and services (“Bundled Offerings”).

Revenue reconciling amounts and other for the six months ended December 31, 2015 included a net $3.0 billion of revenue deferrals related to sales of Windows 10 and a net $191 million of revenue deferrals related to Halo 5. Revenue reconciling amounts and other for the six months ended December 31, 2014 included the net recognition of $297 million of previously deferred revenue related to Bundled Offerings.

 

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Assets are not allocated to segments for internal reporting presentations. A portion of amortization and depreciation is included with various other costs in an overhead allocation to each segment, and it is impracticable for us to separately identify the amount of amortization and depreciation by segment that is included in the measure of segment profit or loss.

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of Microsoft Corporation

Redmond, Washington

We have reviewed the accompanying consolidated balance sheet of Microsoft Corporation and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2015, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, cash flows, and stockholders’ equity for the three-month and six-month periods ended December 31, 2015 and 2014. These interim financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management.

We conducted our reviews in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). A review of interim financial information consists principally of applying analytical procedures and making inquiries of persons responsible for financial and accounting matters. It is substantially less in scope than an audit conducted in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the objective of which is the expression of an opinion regarding the financial statements taken as a whole. Accordingly, we do not express such an opinion.

Based on our reviews, we are not aware of any material modifications that should be made to such consolidated interim financial statements for them to be in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

We have previously audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheet of the Company as of June 30, 2015, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, cash flows, and stockholders’ equity for the year then ended (not presented herein); and in our report dated July 31, 2015 (October 26, 2015 as to the effects of the retrospective adjustments in Note 1, 10, 15, and 22) we expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements. In our opinion, the information set forth in the accompanying consolidated balance sheet as of June 30, 2015 is fairly stated, in all material respects, in relation to the consolidated balance sheet from which it has been derived.

/s/ DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP

Seattle, Washington

January 28, 2016

 

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ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Note About Forward-Looking Statements

This report includes estimates, projections, statements relating to our business plans, objectives, and expected operating results that are “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Forward-looking statements may appear throughout this report, including the following sections: “Management’s Discussion and Analysis,” and “Risk Factors.” These forward-looking statements generally are identified by the words “believe,” “project,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “estimate,” “intend,” “strategy,” “future,” “opportunity,” “plan,” “may,” “should,” “will,” “would,” “will be,” “will continue,” “will likely result,” and similar expressions. Forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and assumptions that are subject to risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially. We describe risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results and events to differ materially in “Risk Factors” (Part II, Item 1A of this Form 10-Q), “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk” (Part I, Item 3 of this Form 10-Q), and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis” (Part I, Item 2 of this Form 10-Q). We undertake no obligation to update or revise publicly any forward-looking statements, whether because of new information, future events, or otherwise.

OVERVIEW

The following Management’s Discussion and Analysis (“MD&A”) is intended to help the reader understand the results of operations and financial condition of Microsoft Corporation. MD&A is provided as a supplement to, and should be read in conjunction with, our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended June 30, 2015, our Form 8-K filed on October 27, 2015, and our consolidated financial statements and the accompanying Notes to Financial Statements in this Form 10-Q.

Microsoft is a technology leader focused on building best-in-class platforms and productivity services for a mobile-first, cloud-first world. We strive to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. We develop and market software, services, and devices that deliver new opportunities, greater convenience, and enhanced value to people’s lives.

We generate revenue by developing, licensing, and supporting a wide range of software products, by offering an array of services, including cloud-based services to consumers and businesses, by designing, manufacturing, and selling devices that integrate with our cloud-based services, and by delivering relevant online advertising to a global audience. Our most significant expenses are related to compensating employees, designing, manufacturing, marketing, and selling our products and services, datacenter costs in support of our cloud-based services, and income taxes.

In July 2015, we announced a restructuring of our phone business, including the creation of the Windows and Devices Group. This reinforces our strategy to create a vibrant Windows ecosystem with a single set of experiences across our first-party device family and original equipment manufacturer (“OEM”) offerings. Part of this strategy involves focusing our phone devices on a narrower range of customer categories and differentiating through the combination of hardware and software we are uniquely positioned to offer. Our change in strategy for the phone business is expected to result in a reduction in units sold and associated expenses.

Highlights from the second quarter of fiscal year 2016 included:

 

   

Our commercial cloud, which primarily comprises Office 365 Commercial, Microsoft Azure, and Dynamics CRM Online, reached an annualized run rate* exceeding $9.4 billion.

 

   

Office 365 Consumer subscribers increased to 20.6 million.

 

   

Dynamics CRM Online seats more than doubled year-over-year.

 

   

Microsoft Azure revenue from premium services nearly tripled year-over-year, and over one third of the Fortune 500 have Enterprise Mobility, nearly tripling year-over-year.

 

   

Windows 10 is now running on more than 200 million devices around the world.

 

   

Xbox Live monthly active users grew 30% year-over-year to 48 million.

 

*

Annualized run rate was calculated by multiplying December 2015 revenue by twelve months.

 

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Industry Trends

Our industry is dynamic and highly competitive, with frequent changes in both technologies and business models. Each industry shift is an opportunity to conceive new products, new technologies, or new ideas that can further transform the industry and our business. At Microsoft, we push the boundaries of what is possible through a broad range of research and development activities that seek to identify and address the changing demands of customers, industry trends, and competitive forces.

Economic Conditions, Challenges, and Risks

The market for software, devices, and cloud-based services is dynamic and highly competitive. Our competitors are developing new software and devices, while also deploying competing cloud-based services for consumers and businesses. The devices and form factors customers prefer evolve rapidly, and influence how users access services in the cloud, and in some cases, the user’s choice of which suite of cloud-based services to use. We must continue to evolve and adapt over an extended time in pace with this changing environment. The investments we are making in devices and infrastructure will continue to increase our operating costs and may decrease our operating margins.

Our success is highly dependent on our ability to attract and retain qualified employees. We hire a mix of university and industry talent worldwide. Microsoft competes for talented individuals globally by offering an exceptional working environment, broad customer reach, scale in resources, the ability to grow one’s career across many different products and businesses, and competitive compensation and benefits. Aggregate demand for our software, services, and devices is correlated to global macroeconomic and geopolitical factors, which remain dynamic.

Our international operations provide a significant portion of our total revenue and expenses. Many of these revenue and expenses are denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. As a result, changes in foreign exchange rates may significantly affect revenue and expenses. The strengthening of the U.S. dollar relative to certain foreign currencies throughout fiscal year 2015, and continuing into fiscal year 2016, negatively impacted reported revenue and reduced reported expenses from our international operations in the current period as compared to the prior year.

See a discussion of these factors and other risks under Risk Factors (Part II, Item 1A of this Form 10-Q).

Seasonality

Our revenue historically has fluctuated quarterly and has generally been highest in the second quarter of our fiscal year due to corporate calendar year-end spending trends in our major markets and holiday season spending by consumers.

Unearned Revenue

Quarterly and annual revenue is impacted by the deferral of revenue, primarily including:

 

   

Revenue deferred on Windows 10 licenses to reflect ratable recognition over the life of the device.

 

   

Revenue deferred on bundled products and services (“Bundled Offerings”).

If our customers choose to license cloud-based versions of our products and services rather than licensing transaction-based products and services, the associated revenue will shift from being recognized at the time of the transaction to being recognized over the subscription period or upon consumption, as applicable.

Reportable Segments

The segment amounts included in MD&A are presented on a basis consistent with our internal management reporting. Segment information appearing in Note 18 – Segment Information of the Notes to Financial Statements is also presented on this basis. All differences between our internal management reporting basis and accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”), along with certain corporate-level and other activity, are included in Corporate and Other.

In June 2015, we announced a change in organizational structure as part of our transformation in the mobile-first, cloud-first world. During the first quarter of fiscal year 2016, the Company’s chief operating decision maker, who is also our Chief Executive Officer, requested changes in the information that he regularly reviews for purposes of allocating resources and assessing performance. As a result, beginning in fiscal year 2016, we report our financial performance

 

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based on our new segments, Productivity and Business Processes, Intelligent Cloud, and More Personal Computing, and analyze operating income as the measure of segment profitability. We have recast certain previously reported amounts to conform to the way we internally manage and monitor segment performance.

Our reportable segments are described below.

Productivity and Business Processes

Our Productivity and Business Processes segment consists of products and cloud services in our portfolio of productivity, communication, and information services, spanning a variety of devices and platforms. This segment primarily comprises:

 

   

Office Commercial, including volume licensing and subscriptions to Office 365 Commercial for products and cloud services such as Microsoft Office, Exchange, SharePoint, and Skype for Business, and related Client Access Licenses (“CALs”).

 

   

Office Consumer, including Office sold through retail or through an Office 365 Consumer subscription, and Office Consumer Services, including Outlook.com, OneDrive, and consumer Skype services.

 

   

Microsoft Dynamics business solutions, including Dynamics ERP products, Dynamics CRM on-premises, and Dynamics CRM Online (“Microsoft Dynamics”).

Intelligent Cloud

Our Intelligent Cloud segment consists of our public, private, and hybrid server products and cloud services that can power modern business. This segment primarily comprises:

 

   

Server products and cloud services, including Windows Server, Microsoft SQL Server, Visual Studio, System Center, and related CALs, as well as Microsoft Azure.

 

   

Enterprise Services, including Premier Support Services and Microsoft Consulting Services.

More Personal Computing

Our More Personal Computing segment consists of products and services geared towards harmonizing the interests of end users, developers, and information technology professionals across screens of all sizes. This segment primarily comprises:

 

   

Windows, including Windows OEM licensing (“Windows OEM”) and other non-volume licensing of the Windows operating system, volume licensing of the Windows operating system, patent licensing, Windows Embedded, MSN display advertising, and Windows Phone licensing.

 

   

Devices, including phones, Surface, and Microsoft PC accessories.

 

   

Gaming, including Xbox hardware; Xbox Live, comprising transactions, subscriptions, and advertising; video games; and third-party video game royalties.

 

   

Search advertising.

SUMMARY RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

(In millions, except percentages and per share amounts)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Percentage

Change

    

Six Months Ended

December 31,

   

Percentage

Change

 


     2015     2014            2015     2014        

Revenue

   $    23,796      $    26,470        (10)%       $    44,175      $    49,671        (11)%   

Gross margin

   $ 13,924      $ 16,334        (15)%       $ 27,096      $ 31,262        (13)%   

Operating income

   $ 6,026      $ 7,776        (23)%       $ 11,819      $ 13,620        (13)%   

Diluted earnings per share

   $ 0.62      $ 0.71        (13)%       $ 1.20      $ 1.25        (4)%   


 

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Three months ended December 31, 2015 compared with three months ended December 31, 2014

Revenue decreased $2.7 billion or 10%, primarily due to the impact of a net revenue deferral related to Windows 10 of $1.7 billion and an unfavorable foreign currency impact of approximately $1.2 billion or 5%. Windows 10 revenue is primarily recognized upfront in the More Personal Computing segment and the deferral and subsequent recognition of revenue is reflected in Corporate and Other. More Personal Computing revenue decreased, primarily due to lower revenue from Devices and Windows, offset in part by growth in Gaming and search advertising revenue. Intelligent Cloud revenue increased, primarily due to higher revenue from server products and cloud services, including Microsoft Azure, as well as higher Enterprise Services revenue.

Operating income decreased $1.8 billion or 23%, primarily due to lower gross margin, offset in part by a reduction in operating expenses in the current year, driven by a reduction in phone expenses, and impairment, integration, and restructuring expenses in the prior year. Gross margin decreased $2.4 billion or 15%, driven by the impact of a net $1.7 billion revenue deferral related to Windows 10 and an unfavorable foreign currency impact of approximately $1.0 billion or 6%. Productivity and Business Processes gross margin decreased, offset in part by higher gross margin from Intelligent Cloud.

Key changes in expenses were:

 

   

Cost of revenue decreased $264 million or 3%, mainly due to lower phone sales, offset in part by growth in our commercial cloud and search advertising.

 

   

Sales and marketing expenses decreased $355 million or 8%, primarily driven by a reduction in phone expenses and a favorable foreign currency impact of approximately 4%.

 

   

Impairment, integration, and restructuring expenses were $243 million in the prior year, comprised mainly of restructuring charges associated with our July 2014 restructuring plan to simplify our organization and align the purchase of Nokia Corporation’s Devices and Services business (“NDS”) with our overall strategy (“Phone Hardware Integration Plan”).

Diluted earnings per share (“EPS”) was $0.62 for the three months ended December 31, 2015. Current year diluted EPS was negatively impacted by revenue deferrals, primarily related to Windows 10 and Halo 5, which resulted in a decrease to diluted EPS of $0.16. Diluted EPS was $0.71 for the three months ended December 31, 2014. Prior year diluted EPS was favorably impacted by the recognition of previously deferred net revenue related to Bundled Offerings, and negatively impacted by impairment, integration, and restructuring expenses, which resulted in a net increase to diluted EPS of $0.01.

Six months ended December 31, 2015 compared with six months ended December 31, 2014

Revenue decreased $5.5 billion or 11%, primarily due to the impact of a net revenue deferral related to Windows 10 of $3.0 billion and an unfavorable foreign currency impact of approximately $2.4 billion or 5%. More Personal Computing revenue decreased, primarily due to lower revenue from Devices and Windows, offset in part by revenue growth in search advertising and Gaming. Intelligent Cloud revenue increased, primarily due to higher revenue from server products and cloud services, including Microsoft Azure, as well as higher Enterprise Services revenue.

Operating income decreased $1.8 billion or 13%, primarily due to lower gross margin, offset in part by prior year impairment, integration, and restructuring expenses and a reduction in operating expenses in the current year, driven by a reduction in phone expenses. Gross margin decreased $4.2 billion or 13%, driven by the impact of a net $3.0 billion revenue deferral related to Windows 10 and an unfavorable foreign currency impact of approximately $2.0 billion or 6%. Productivity and Business Processes and More Personal Computing gross margin decreased, offset in part by higher gross margin from Intelligent Cloud.

Key changes in expenses were:

 

   

Cost of revenue decreased $1.3 billion or 7%, mainly due to lower phone sales, offset in part by growth in our commercial cloud.

 

   

Impairment, integration, and restructuring expenses were $1.4 billion in the prior year, comprised mainly of restructuring charges associated with our Phone Hardware Integration Plan.

 

   

Sales and marketing expenses decreased $750 million or 9%, primarily driven by a reduction in phone expenses and a favorable foreign currency impact of approximately 4%.

 

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Diluted EPS was $1.20 for the six months ended December 31, 2015. Current year diluted EPS was negatively impacted by revenue deferrals, primarily related to Windows 10 and Halo 5, which resulted in a decrease to diluted EPS of $0.25. Diluted EPS was $1.25 for the six months ended December 31, 2014. Prior year diluted EPS was favorably impacted by the recognition of previously deferred net revenue related to Bundled Offerings, and negatively impacted by impairment, integration, and restructuring expenses, which resulted in a net decrease to diluted EPS of $0.11.

SEGMENT RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

(In millions, except percentages)   

Three Months Ended

December 31,

   

Percentage

Change

    

Six Months Ended

December 31,

   

Percentage

Change

 


     2015     2014            2015     2014        

Revenue

                                                 

Productivity and Business Processes

   $ 6,690      $ 6,822        (2)%       $ 12,990      $ 13,312        (2)%   

Intelligent Cloud

     6,343        6,041        5%         12,232        11,516        6%   

More Personal Computing

     12,660        13,282        (5)%         22,114        24,548        (10)%   

Corporate and Other

     (1,897     325        *         (3,161     295        *   


 


 


  


 


 


Total revenue

   $    23,796      $    26,470        (10)%       $    44,175      $    49,671        (11)%   
    


 


          


 


       

Operating income (loss)

                                                 

Productivity and Business Processes

   $ 3,305      $ 3,587        (8)%       $ 6,460      $ 6,988        (8)%   

Intelligent Cloud

     2,580        2,600        (1)%         4,977        4,705        6%   

More Personal Computing

     2,038        1,506        35%         3,542        3,014        18%   

Corporate and Other

     (1,897     83        *         (3,160     (1,087     *   


 


 


  


 


 


Total operating income

   $ 6,026      $ 7,776        (23)%       $ 11,819      $ 13,620        (13)%   
    


 


          


 


       

 

*

Not meaningful.

Reportable Segments

Three months ended December 31, 2015 compared with three months ended December 31, 2014

Productivity and Business Processes

Productivity and Business Processes revenue decreased $132 million or 2%, primarily due to an unfavorable foreign currency impact of approximately 7%.

 

   

Office Consumer revenue decreased $107 million or 14%, driven by an unfavorable foreign currency impact of approximately 6% and a decline in the consumer PC market, offset in part by revenue growth from Office 365 Consumer, mainly due to recurring subscriptions, and a higher percentage of PCs with Office.

 

   

Office Commercial revenue decreased $36 million or 1%, driven by an unfavorable foreign currency